If you have at least 90 days of aggregate active duty service after Sept. 10, 2001, and are still on active duty, or if you are an honorably discharged veteran or were discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days, you may be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ administered program, according to www.benefits.va.gov.

But do you really understand your Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits?

Do you know what type of degree and non-degree education is covered?

Do you realize what financial support is available for you and your family?

As you’re beginning your separation from the military and head to school, we’re sure you have questions and we have answers.

Here’s an updated version of what you need to understand about your Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.

 

post-9/11-gi-bill-infographic

 

Check out this story and much more for FREE in the digital July 2019 issue of G.I. Jobs magazine!

 

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2019-07-24T09:13:41-04:00

5 Comments

  1. […] While the political winds can always shift in regard to the laws that govern the GI Bill, it seems that at the moment, the MGIB is safe. Jemison says that while the House of Representatives recently approved the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017, which would make changes to the Post-9/11 GI Bill, those changes would include removing the 15-year time limit on using Post-9/11 benefits. […]

  2. […] about using your GI Bill, or taking your VocRehab benefits out for a test drive? Colleges have really ramped up their game […]

  3. […] at no cost to the service member, through incentive benefits such as Tuition Assistance and the GI Bill (which many people don’t have to tap into until after they […]

  4. […] there’s a lengthy application process, and maybe you don’t want to burn too many GI Bill benefits before you figure out what you want to do. Never fear: Here are 12 good jobs you can get without a […]

  5. […] new employer, and as such, erroneously believe they can’t simultaneously take the time to use their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to continue their […]

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